What’s In A Name? (8-26-2017)

What’s in a name?  Those odd immigrant names really took a beating in the US. Our German great-grand-father’s name was “Boldewahn” But it was spelled:

Baldewan
Boldwahl
Boldean
Boltewahn

My favorites are:
Oldewahn
Bolderwack 
and Baltimore

To be fair, the name was often spelled in the German church books as Bolduan. The Nagel family think that these spelling variations are due to how  cursive writing was taught in Germany before the 1940s. The script was stylized and ornate and is hard for many of us today to read. It was called the “Sütterlin Schreibschrift”. After WW2 the modern “Latin” script was taught that most of us are familiar with here in the USA.

William Baltimore 1884

Baltimore, 1884 Oshkosh City Directory)

 

William Bolderwack 1920
Bolderwhack (1920 Oshkosh Rural Address Book)
Oldewahn Wedding Anniversary 1930
Oldewahn (1930 Oshkosh, WI newspaper)

 

Boltewsku 1930 Census
Boltewahn or Boltewsku (1930 US Census)

 

Bolduan
Bolduan (German Church Register 1851, Gruenwald, Kreis Neustettin, Pommern)

Friedrich Dragorius’ name was also many variations:

Drigolias (this is the name that Erna Boldewahn said was the correct spelling)
Dragolis,
Dragorus,
Dragores,
Dragoras
and even Tragorius or Gragorius

The Greeks fared even worse. The “Kamoutsis” family name was spelled:

Kamoutsi,
Kamuchy,
Kamoutzis,
Kamuches,
Kamuchas,
Camoutsis,
Kamutes,
Camoutzis,
Coumountzis
Kamuckey,
Camouzis.
 
At one point family members used “Kames
Camountzis (Ellis Island) – Line 4
Kames, 1935 Northwestern Railroad Employment Card
Kamuchas or Kamuches (1910 US Census)